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Viracocha's Temple

Updated: Sep 15, 2023


ᴀʀᴛɪꜱᴛ ᴜɴᴋɴᴏᴡɴ

The name Viracocha comes from one of the oldest languages in the world ;

The Quechua language, which is an indigenous language spoken primarily in the Andean region of South America.


"Virac" / "Wira" or "Wiraq" is associated with "fat" or "foam" in Quechua. It can be used to refer to something vast, vastness, or something that is extensive like the sea.


"Cocha" / "Qocha" or "Qucha" means lake in Quechua.


Therefore, "Viracocha" can be interpreted as "The Fat/Extensive or Vast Lake" or "The Foam Lake."


Which has particular relevance given the association of the deity with Lake Titicaca, one of the most sacred sites in the Andean region and a significant part of the mythology surrounding him.


Tiqsi Huiracocha or Ticsi Viracocha In the Quechuan languages, tiqsi means "origin" or "beginning".

According to German archeologist Max Uhle, "foam lake" is an incomprehensible name. He points out that Vira (Huira) can also be derived from the Quechua word huyra ("the end of all things"), and that Ticsi Viracocha therefore could have the meaning "lake of origin and of the end of all things".



𝐎𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐛𝐲 :


Huiracocha

Hueracocha

Wiraqocha

Wiraqucha

Wiracocha

Wiraccocha

Wiro Qocha

Qiracocha

Naymlap















𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚’𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 :


“𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗩𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗰𝗼𝗰𝗵𝗮,

𝗜 𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝗱 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗯𝘆𝘀𝘀𝗮𝗹 𝗱𝗲𝗽𝘁𝗵𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗹𝗮𝗸𝗲,

𝗕𝗿𝗶𝗻𝗴𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗳𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗹𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗿 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗼𝘀.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗼𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗰𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗸𝗻𝗼𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗱𝗴𝗲,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗺𝗻𝗶𝗽𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘄𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗳𝗮𝗯𝗿𝗶𝗰 𝗼𝗳 𝗿𝗲𝗮𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆.

𝗠𝘆 𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝗿𝗲𝘀𝗼𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆 𝗺𝗼𝘂𝗻𝘁𝗮𝗶𝗻, 𝗿𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗱,

𝗜𝘁 𝗶𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆 𝘄𝗵𝗶𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝗿 𝗺𝗼𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗶𝗻𝗱.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗼𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗴𝗼𝗱𝘀,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗱𝘀 𝗱𝗼𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗱𝗲𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀,

𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗯𝘆 𝗯𝗼𝘁𝗵 𝗴𝗼𝗱𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗹𝘀.

𝗜𝗻 𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗜 𝗯𝗲𝗮𝗿 𝗮 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗳𝗳,

𝗮 𝘀𝘆𝗺𝗯𝗼𝗹 𝗼𝗳 𝗮𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗿𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗴𝘂𝗶𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲,

𝗜𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗜 𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗱 𝗮 𝗯𝗮𝗴 𝗼𝗳 𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗻𝗲𝘀,

𝗵𝗶𝘁𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗿𝗲𝘁𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝘀𝗺𝗼𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝗲𝘅𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗮 𝗯𝗲𝗮𝗰𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝘄𝗶𝘀𝗱𝗼𝗺,

𝗘𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝘀𝗲𝗲𝗸 𝗮𝗻𝘀𝘄𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗹𝗶𝗳𝗲'𝘀 𝗺𝘆𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗴𝘂𝗶𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘀𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗯𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗼𝘄𝗲𝗱 𝗵𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗶𝗳𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝗰𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘇𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻,

𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝗺𝘆 𝘁𝗲𝗮𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴𝘀 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘀𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗲𝗱 𝗽𝗿𝗶𝗺𝗶𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗶𝗯𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗲𝗺𝗽𝗶𝗿𝗲𝘀.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝘂𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗿𝗲𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗰𝗿𝗮𝗳𝘁𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝗮𝗴𝗿𝗶𝗰𝘂𝗹𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲, 𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵𝗶𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗰𝗿𝗮𝗳𝘁𝘀𝗺𝗮𝗻𝘀𝗵𝗶𝗽.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗱𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗸𝗲𝘆𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗶𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝘀𝗺𝗼𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱

𝗰𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗹𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴𝘀.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗼𝗿 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗱𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗿𝗼𝘆𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴𝘀.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝗮𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝘀𝗺𝗶𝗰 𝘁𝗮𝗽𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗿𝘆,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗿 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝘄𝗮𝗹𝗸𝘀 𝗮𝗺𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗺𝗲𝗻,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗼𝘄𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝗸𝗻𝗼𝘄𝗹𝗲𝗱𝗴𝗲,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗼𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗱,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵𝗶𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝗲𝘅𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲,

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗲𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝗹,

𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝗜 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘀𝗰𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗯𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗶𝗺𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘀𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲.

𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗩𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗰𝗼𝗰𝗵𝗮.”




𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬



𝐈𝐧𝐜𝐚


𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚


Viracocha was the supreme god and great creator god in the pre-Inca and Inca mythology,

He was the father of all other Inca gods and it was he who formed the earth, sky,

sun, moon, stars and all living beings.



𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚’𝐬 𝐋𝐞𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐝


At first there was only darkness, and within the darkness were the waters of the great lake, Titicaca. Then Viracocha, called Illa Ticsi Viracocha, the Bright One, the First One, the Foam of the Sea, came forth from the waters or sometimes the cave of Pacaritambo and made the earth and the sky.

Then fashioned from stone a race of giants, creating the first of mankind. Displeased with them, he turned some giants back into stone and destroyed the rest in a flood.

Then he created the sun and made it run in its proper course. Also, he created the moon and the stars, and he put them into the sky.

He then created the second of mankind, In some versions he made them from smaller stone in others they are made of clay.

he painted the dresses they were to wear, (In some versions he breathed life into them making them come to life.)

then dispersed them so that they would later emerge from caves, hills, trees, and bodies of water.

He gave the people social customs, food, and other aspects of civilization. Appearing as a bearded old man with staff and long garment, Viracocha journeyed from the mountainous east toward the northwest, traversing the Inca state, teaching his creation as he went. At Manta, on the coast of Ecuador, he spread his cloak and set out over the waters of the Pacific ocean (Walking on the water) to never be seen again.


In some versions he wandered the earth disguised as a beggar, teaching his new creations the basics of civilization, as well as working numerous miracles.


In another version, he travelled and carried a staff. He was old, they say, lean and bearded. His cloak was long, and his hair was long.


In another version, he was assisted on his travels by two sons or brothers called Imaymana Viracocha and Tocapo Viracocha. The god was not always well received despite the knowledge he imparted, sometimes even suffering stones thrown at him.



𝐏𝐞𝐝𝐫𝐨 𝐒𝐚𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞 𝐆𝐚𝐦𝐛𝐨𝐚


Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa noted that Viracocha was described as “a man of medium height, white and dressed in a white robe like an alb secured round the waist, and that he carried a staff and a book in his hands.”



𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐠𝐨𝐝


In one legend he had one son, Inti, and two daughters, Mama Quilla and Pachamama. In this legend, he destroyed the people around Lake Titicaca with a Great Flood called Unu Pachakuti, saving two to bring civilization to the rest of the world, these two beings are Manco Capac, the son of Inti (sometimes taken as the son of Viracocha), which name means “splendid foundation”, and Mama Ocllo, which means “mother fertility”. These two founded the Inca civilization carrying a golden staff, called ‘tapac-yauri’.



𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐬𝐛𝐚𝐧𝐝


In some stories, he has a wife called Mama Cocha.



𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐡𝐞𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐒𝐡𝐞𝐞𝐩 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧


Viracocha placed his two children, a boy and a girl in a boat on Lake Titicaca.

" He placed his golden staff in the hands of his son. He told his son to guide men to a place where that staff, when dropped on the earth, sinks into it. "

The boy found the place where men dwelt, and gathered many tribes, and stopped at the place where the golden staff sank into the earth. And he showed men many wonderful things until the coming of his father, the god Viracocha, who came from the east.


" He lived among men, and taught them many arts. He was, as the priests of those who went before the Incas say here, showed men how to bring streams of water to their cultures, and taught them how to build terraces on up the mountains where the crops would grow. He set up a great cross upon the Caravay Mountain. And when the bird that cries four times at dawn cried, and the light fell upon the cross which he had created, Viracocha passed from among the men. He went down to the sea, and he crossed it to the west. But he told those whom he had left behind that he would send messengers who would protect them and give them renewed knowledge of all that he had taught them. "


ᴀʀᴛ ʙʏ ᴠᴀʟᴍᴀʀᴅᴜᴋ


𝐌𝐮𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐚 / 𝐂𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐜𝐡𝐚


𝐂𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐠𝐮𝐚


Chiminigagua, Chiminichagua or Chimichagua was the supreme being, omnipotent god and creator of the world in the religion of the Muisca.

The supreme being of the Muisca was a static deity without body who ruled over all the other gods. He was however never praised directly, yet through his lesser gods of the Sun, Moon and fertility; Chía, Sué and Chaquén. Chiminigagua's messenger god was Bochica.


𝐁𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐚


Also alluded to as Nemquetaha, Nemqueteba and Sadigua.

Bochica was the founding hero of their civilization, who according to legend brought morals and laws to the people and taught them agriculture and other crafts.


𝐁𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐚'𝐬 𝐋𝐞𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐝


According to Chibcha legends, Bochica was a bearded man who came from the east. He taught the primitive Chibcha people ethical and moral norms and gave them a model by which to organize their states, with one spiritual and one secular leader.

Bochica also taught the people agriculture, metalworking and other crafts before leaving for the west to live as an ascetic. When the Muisca later forsook the teachings of Bochica and turned to a life of excess, a flood engulfed the Savannah of Bogotá, where they lived. Upon appealing for aid from their hero, Bochica returned on a rainbow and with a strike from his staff, created the Tequendama Falls, through which the floodwaters could drain away.

Bochica appeared in Pasca in Cundinamarca and later in Gámeza, Boyacá where the people showed him hospitability. He retreated in the Toya cave where many caciques visited him for wisdom.



𝐀𝐳𝐭𝐞𝐜


𝐐𝐮𝐞𝐭𝐳𝐚𝐥𝐜ó𝐚𝐭𝐥


Quetzalcoatl is a significant deity particularly in Aztec and Toltec cultures,

The name "Quetzalcoatl" is derived from the Nahuatl language,

spoken by the Aztecs and it means "Precious serpent" or "Quetzal-feathered Serpent"

In the 17th century, Ixtlilxóchitl, a descendant of Aztec royalty and historian of the Nahua people, wrote, "Quetzalcoatl, in its literal sense, means 'serpent of precious feathers' but in the allegorical sense, 'wisest of men'."


Quetzalcoatl is often depicted as a feathered serpent, symbolising the combination of earthly and celestial forces.

The serpent symbolizes the earth, while the feathers symbolize the sky.

However In addition to his guise as a plumed serpent, Quetzalcóatl was often represented as a man with a beard and as Ehécatl, the wind god.


Quetzalcoatl was associated with wind, air, and the breath of life. He was considered a god of wisdom, knowledge, patron of priests, arts, crafts ,the inventor of the calendar and of books, the protector of goldsmiths and other craftsmen and civilization.

He was also associated with Venus and the sun.


He was often attributed with introducing important aspects of culture to humanity, such as agriculture, writing, and the calendar.


Quetzalcóatl was the symbol of death and resurrection. With his companion Xolotl, a dog-headed god, he was said to have descended to the underground hell of Mictlan to gather the bones of the ancient dead. Those bones he anointed with his own blood, giving birth to the men who inhabit the present universe.


𝐓𝐮𝐥𝐚


One important body of myths describes Quetzalcóatl as the priest-king of Tula, the capital of the Toltecs.

He never offered human victims, only snakes, birds, and butterflies.

But the god of the night sky, Tezcatlipoca, expelled him from Tula by performing feats of black magic.

Quetzalcóatl wandered down to the coast of the “divine water” and then immolated himself on a pyre, emerging as the planet Venus.

According to another version, he embarked upon a raft made of snakes and disappeared beyond the eastern horizon.


𝐂𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐱 𝐂𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐩𝐨𝐩𝐨𝐜𝐚


Quetzalcoatl was coerced by Tezcatlipoca into becoming drunk on pulque, cavorting with his older sister, Quetzalpetlatl, a celibate priestess, and neglecting their religious duties. (Many academics conclude this passage implies incest.) The next morning, Quetzalcoatl, feeling shame and regret, had his servants build him a stone chest, adorn him in turquoise, and then, laying in the chest, set himself on fire. His ashes rose into the sky and then his heart followed, becoming the morning star, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli.


He is also attributed with having brought the cacao plant from a sacred mountain to the Toltec people, teaching the women how to make traditional drinking chocolate.



𝐘𝐮𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐜 𝐌𝐚𝐲𝐚


𝐊𝐮𝐤𝐮𝐥𝐤á𝐧


Kukulkán is also known in other Mayan groups such as the K’iche’ Maya as Gucumatz or Qʼuqʼumatz.


Many associate him with the Aztec god Quetzalcoatl, as he too is a feathered serpent,

He was also regarded as a god of wisdom, knowledge, and understanding.

Kukulkan's role extended beyond the natural world and often had spiritual and cosmological significance.

He was also the god of agriculture, as there are myths claiming that he gave humanity maize (corn). He was also worshipped as a god of language because he was also thought to have come up with human speech and written symbols


Kukulkán is a creator god who favours life, with power over the elements, particularly water and wind, and the breath of life.

Kukulkan is also seen as the god of the four elements (water, earth, fire, air), each element is represented by a plant or animal:

  • air – the vulture

  • Fire - the lizard

  • Earth - the corn

  • water - the fish.

In Mayan script, Kukulkan can be represented with a bone flute, a jaguar, an eagle, a basin of blood, or a snail.


Kukulkan held a central place in Maya religious practices and cosmology. He was often associated with rituals and ceremonies, reflecting his importance in the spiritual lives of the Maya people.


In many myths, Kukulkan lives in the sky, is the sky itself, or is the planet Venus.


According to one legend, Kukulkan comes out of the ocean and may one day return there.

A Mayan legend says that he will return to earth during the end of the world .


ᴀʀᴛ ʙʏ ʟᴜɪꜱʙᴇɴᴛᴏᴀʀᴛ


𝐍𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐞


𝐎𝐝𝐢𝐧


Odin is the main god in Norse mythology, described as immensely wise.

He was one of the three brothers who created the world and humans.

He can be recognised by his hat and cloak, long beard, and only one eye.

His spear Gungnir is one of his main attributes, which he wields as a powerful and magical weapon.


𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝


Odin and his two brothers were bothered by the fact that the giants outnumbered the Aesir, the giants were constantly conceiving new giants. The only solution they could see was to kill Ymir, the three brothers waited until Ymir was asleep before they assaulted him.


The world was created from the remains of the giant Ymir, The three brothers dragged Ymir’s lifeless body towards the center of Ginnungagap, this is the place where they created the world from the remains of Ymir.

The blood became the oceans, rivers, and lakes. The flesh became the land. The bones became the mountains. The teeth were made into rocks. The hair became the grass and trees. The eyelashes became Midgard.

They threw the brain up in the air and it became the clouds, and the skull became the sky, Ymir’s skull would be the lid that covered the new world.

The brothers grabbed some of the sparks shooting out from Muspelheim, the land of fire. They threw the sparks up toward the inside of the skull, these sparks gleamed at night and this is what we call the stars. On the plains of Idavoll, they built Asgard, which would be the home of the Gods. Very far away from Asgard, in a place called Jotunheim was the giants allowed to live.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐧


According to the mythology, Men were created from the vegetable world by the gods Odin, Hoenir and Lodur. One day the three gods were travelling across the barren earth and came across two trees with life-less twisted trunks. Odin shaped each of the trees into a man and a woman, and gave each of them breath. Hoenir gave them a soul and the ability to reason. Lodur gave them warmth and the fresh colours of life. The man was called Ask and his wife was Embla, and they proceeded to create the race of man.


𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐄𝐝𝐝𝐚


𝐂𝐡. 𝟓


“In Asgard is a place called Hlidskjalf, and when Odin seated himself there in the high−seat, he saw over the whole world, and what every man was doing, and he knew all things that he saw. His wife hight Frigg, and she was the daughter of Fjorgvin, and from their offspring are descended the race that we call asas, who inhabited Asgard the old and the realms that lie about it, and all that race are known to be gods. And for this reason odin is called Alfather, that he is the father of all gods and men, and of all things that were made by him and by his might. Jord (earth) was his daughter and his wife.”



𝐂𝐡.𝟖


“Odin is called Allfather because he is father of all the

gods. He is also called Father of the Slain, because all those that fall in battle are the sons of his adoption; for

them he appoints Valhalland Vingolf, and they are then

called Champions. He is also called God of the Hanged,

God of Gods, God of Cargoes.”



𝐄𝐠𝐲𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧


𝐏𝐭𝐚𝐡


Ptah is closely associated with creation, craftsmanship, and fertility.

He was considered one of the chief gods in the Egyptian pantheon.


Ptah was often depicted as a mummified figure with a skullcap and holding a scepter, indicating his role as a creator and craftsman. He was believed to have created the world through his thoughts and speech. In some Egyptian texts, Ptah is referred to as "He who gave life through the heart and tongue," emphasising his creative power through words and intellect.

One of Ptah's notable roles was as the patron deity of craftsmen and artisans. He was associated with metalworking, architecture, Creation through thought and speech and other creative endeavours. The city of Memphis was considered his main cult centre.



𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐩𝐨𝐭𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐚


𝐄𝐧𝐤𝐢


𝘌𝘯𝘬𝘪, 𝘢𝘭𝘴𝘰 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘢𝘴 𝘌𝘢, 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘮𝘢𝘫𝘰𝘳 𝘥𝘦𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘔𝘦𝘴𝘰𝘱𝘰𝘵𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘢𝘯 𝘮𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘰𝘨𝘺.

𝘏𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘴𝘩𝘪𝘱𝘱𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘚𝘶𝘮𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘢𝘯𝘴, 𝘈𝘬𝘬𝘢𝘥𝘪𝘢𝘯𝘴, 𝘉𝘢𝘣𝘺𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘪𝘢𝘯𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘈𝘴𝘴𝘺𝘳𝘪𝘢𝘯𝘴, 𝘢𝘮𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘤𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘻𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘨𝘪𝘰𝘯.

𝘌𝘯𝘬𝘪 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘈𝘯𝘶𝘯𝘯𝘢𝘬𝘪, 𝘢 𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘱 𝘰𝘧 𝘥𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘔𝘦𝘴𝘰𝘱𝘰𝘵𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘢𝘯 𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘺𝘦𝘥 𝘴𝘪𝘨𝘯𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘳𝘰𝘭𝘦𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘨𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘭𝘥.

Enki was the keeper of the divine powers called Me, the gifts of Civilization. He is often shown with the horned crown of divinity.

Considered the master shaper of the world 𝘌𝘯𝘬𝘪 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘰𝘤𝘪𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳, 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘥𝘰𝘮, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸𝘭𝘦𝘥𝘨𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘰𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘧𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘩𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳, 𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴, 𝘢𝘴 𝘸𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘢𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘰𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘤𝘳𝘢𝘧𝘵𝘴, 𝘮𝘢𝘨𝘪𝘤, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘥𝘰𝘮.


𝘌𝘯𝘬𝘪 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘰𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘭𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘥𝘦𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘪𝘵𝘺 and sometimes depicted as holding a staff.

𝘏𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘴𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘣𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘧𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘰𝘳 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘧 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘪𝘵𝘺, 𝘰𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘴 𝘣𝘺 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸𝘭𝘦𝘥𝘨𝘦, 𝘵𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘤𝘳𝘰𝘱𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘪𝘧𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘤𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘻𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯.



𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚


𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐒𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚











𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐄𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭: 𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫

𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 🜄

𝐄𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐡 🜃

𝐅𝐢𝐫𝐞 🜂

𝐀𝐢𝐫 🜁

𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐏𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐭: 𝐒𝐮𝐧 / 𝐕𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐬

𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐥: 𝐆𝐨𝐥𝐝

𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐃𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧: 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭

𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚'𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐬: 𝐖𝐡𝐢𝐭𝐞, 𝐆𝐨𝐥𝐝, 𝐘𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰, 𝐓𝐮𝐫𝐪𝐮𝐨𝐢𝐬𝐞, 𝐁𝐥𝐮𝐞, 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐧, 𝐑𝐞𝐝.


𝐎𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 :

ᴄʜɪᴄʜᴀ

ᴄᴏʀɴ ʙᴇᴇʀ

ᴄᴏʀɴ

ᴘᴏᴛᴀᴛᴏ

ᴄʀᴏᴘꜱ

ᴄᴏᴄᴀ ʟᴇᴀᴠᴇꜱ

ꜰɪꜱʜ

ᴛᴇxᴛɪʟᴇꜱ ᴀɴᴅ ᴡᴇᴀᴠɪɴɢꜱ

ᴘᴏᴛᴛᴇʀʏ

ʜᴀɴᴅᴄʀᴀꜰᴛᴇᴅ ɪᴛᴇᴍꜱ

ᴠɪʀᴀᴄᴏᴄʜᴀ ɪɴ ᴀʀᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ɪᴄᴏɴᴏɢʀᴀᴘʜʏ

ꜱᴛᴀᴛᴜᴇꜱ ᴏꜰ ;

ᴠɪʀᴀᴄᴏᴄʜᴀ

ꜱɴᴀᴋᴇꜱ

ʟʟᴀᴍᴀ ᴀɴᴅ ᴀʟᴘᴀᴄᴀꜱ

ᴄᴏɴᴅᴏʀ

ᴘᴜᴍᴀ

ᴍɪɴɪᴀᴛᴜʀᴇ ʀᴇᴘʀᴇꜱᴇɴᴛᴀᴛɪᴏɴꜱ ᴏꜰ ᴛʜᴇ ;

ꜱᴜɴ

ᴍᴏᴏɴ

ꜱᴛᴀʀꜱ

ᴀɴᴅᴇᴀɴ ʟɪʟʏ

ᴄᴏɴᴅᴏʀ ꜰᴇᴀᴛʜᴇʀꜱ

ᴡʜɪᴛᴇ ꜰᴇᴀᴛʜᴇʀꜱ

ᴄᴏᴘᴀʟ

ᴄʟᴇᴀʀ Qᴜᴀʀᴛᴢ

ᴄᴇʟᴇꜱᴛɪᴛᴇ

ꜱᴇʟᴇɴɪᴛᴇ

ᴛᴜʀQᴜᴏɪꜱᴇ



𝐋𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚


𝐈 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐞, 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚.

𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚, 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚, 𝐇𝐮𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚, 𝐏𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐲𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐜 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚, 𝐍𝐚𝐲𝐦𝐥𝐚𝐩,

𝐈 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐛𝐲 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬,

𝐑𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐮𝐩 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞.


𝐌𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞,

𝐈 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐤𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞,

𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐯𝐨𝐢𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞'𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞,

𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐞,

𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰,

𝐓𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐜𝐲𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞, 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬,

𝐌𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐒𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐰,

𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐦𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐦𝐞.


𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞.


𝐈𝐥𝐥𝐮𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐦𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐠𝐥𝐨𝐰,

𝐄𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫, 𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐭,

𝐈𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞,

𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐦𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫, 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐦𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭.


𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞.

𝐌𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝,

𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐠𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐱𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝,

𝐎𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐦𝐬

𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐞,

𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐦𝐞,

𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐞,

𝐈 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐦𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐥,

𝐌𝐚𝐲 𝐈 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧,

𝐌𝐚𝐲 𝐈 𝐬𝐞𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐚𝐳𝐞,

𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐝,

𝐀𝐬 𝐈 𝐧𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐦𝐨𝐬, 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧.


𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞.


𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐬,

𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭,

𝐀𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧,

𝐒𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐩𝐭𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬,

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞,

𝐆𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐦𝐞 𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐮𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐈 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐤 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞,

𝐆𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐦𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧,

𝐆𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐚𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭.


𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐊𝐨𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐜𝐢 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚,

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐀𝐩𝐮 𝐐𝐮𝐧 𝐓𝐢𝐪𝐬𝐢 𝐖𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐪𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐚

𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐕𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐚 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐞.


ᴀʀᴛ ʙʏ ɢᴇɴᴢᴏᴍᴀɴ


- Satana














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